• 636-851-5107
  • aaronmanfull@gmail.com

What You Wish You’d Known

Tips for student editors, by student editors.

While the site already has a series of tips aimed at student editors, there’s not one like this. This one is filled with advice for student editors by their peers from around the country. The student editors below were asked a series of questions including what they wish they would have known heading into the job, as well as what the most challenging part of the job was. Their answers have been compiled and will be shared, one a day, for the next 26 days.

If you currently are a student editor or have been a student editor in a journalism program, you are encouraged to add your own tips and advice in the comment section at the bottom of this page.

This series of tips was compiled by Aaron Manfull and Michael Simons. We hope you enjoy them. We hope you get something out of them. We hope they help make your year a great one.

#1
Andrew Valencia
San Jose, CA

What do you wish you would have known?
Don’t be afraid to steer away from what was originally planned, especially in terms of the ladder. If the initial story doesn’t work, find something else that does. There are plenty of stories, it’s just a matter of finding them.
What time management tips do you have?
Time management takes a certain finesse that I have yet to perfect. What works for me is keeping a digital and physical planner/calendar. If you continue to use a planner it’ll come naturally to do the work. Also, during deadlines we would write individual tasks on post it notes that anybody could complete, so there never was a reason to not do something in the office. Once the task was complete, you throw it away and take on the next post it note.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging for me was holding my friends accountable for late submissions. You’re not paying your staff to work so trying to incentivize them can be difficult. If reminding your staff of the long term goals doesn’t work, find a smaller and concentrated group of diligent workers that are just as passionate as you are. These guys end up following you in your editorial footsteps.

– – –

#2
Danielle Grinberg
East Setauket, NY

What do you wish you would have known?
I’d say that I wish I knew how much more work and responsibilities an editor in chief has. I thought being after school for four hours on Monday and Tuesdays (our two yearbook meeting days) as well as the class during the week was the only time the staff spent. Now that I’m actually Editor in Chief myself, I’ve realized that yearbook club and class time were not the only time to do work. I constantly am in our yearbook room during every single free period, every day. I also am taking spreads home via external hard drive, as well as proofs.
What time management tips do you have?
Time management has always been something I’ve been able to deal with. This year, I’ve dealt with a heavy course load of all Honors classes plus 4 AP’s, as well as college applications, Yearbook, a job, and two other clubs. It was hard and I had to neglect some things more than others at certain times, but it’s just all about finding a balance and priorities. Yearbook isn’t super crazy the first half of the year, so I was able to focus on college apps. Now that we’re in the heat of the moment with yearbook, it’s a blessing that college apps are done, second quarter grades are sent to colleges, and I can truly focus on finishing up the best book ever.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part is the fact that I’m best friends with the majority of the editors on my staff. Sometimes it’s difficult for me to be stern with them when they’re fooling around and missing a deadline. You don’t want to make your friends mad, but you want to act as the Editor in Chief. I’d say to any future editors that have this problem, just make sure you address any issues with your staff in the nicest way possible. Don’t yell at them, but something like a friendly reminder like, “Hey is your lacrosse spread done yet? I want to see it before the deadline tomorrow!” can surely keep them on track.

– – –

#3
Brent Pearson
St. Louis, MO

What do you wish you would have known?
Take risks in the beginning. The staff is newer in the beginning but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t still take risks. I always felt our best papers were at the end of the year because everyone was taking more risks (bigger photos, creative leads, color, ect.) It’s okay to take risks in the beginning of the year, because you can only build off of your mistakes. I worked as an editor for 3 years and I wish I would’ve done bigger layouts my sophomore year as an editor in the sports section.
What time management tips do you have?
You always think you have more time in the beginning. Use that time to knock out things that you waste your time doing right before you send the paper to the press.
Work ahead as much as you can. Delegate tasks as an editor. You have the title of an editor but that doesn’t mean you have to do everything all at once. It will be much better for you and the product if you delegate tasks you can’t handle all by yourself.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part is to know that you will have to say no to someone that you like and it’s going to upset them. It’s important to remember to not take anything personally and not hold a grudge. A grudge throughout the semester from issue to issue will cause more problems. The best way I think is to talk it out and figure out a compromise. If it can’t fit into the paper, it can’t. Put it up online and make it an online exclusive.

– – –

#4
Hannah Calkins
Corning, New York

What do you wish you would have known?
It all pays off. Even through the days where you want to cry and pull your hair out and yell at everyone, it makes the bad days better to remember that when the book comes out, it is the best feeling ever, you’ve just got to stick it out!
What time management tips do you have?
Time management is so key. There shouldn’t be time that you waste at the beginning of the year, goofing around or procrastinating because you think you have all the time in the world. Because you don’t. By the time the end of the year rolls around you’re going to wish you had used up all that time when your scrambling to find every free moment you can to finish the book.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
It’s challenging to work with newbies, because of the amount of experience we have under our belts, I know it gets really frustrating when others don’t work at the pace we want them to. So the best advice is to be helpful, take a breath and a step back and work on helping them get up to the level you know they can be at. Just be patient, and firm when you need to be, but keep it positive.

– – –

#5
Sam Dulaney
Saint Charles, Missouri

What do you wish you would have known?
Delegate. Trust your staff. It isn’t about how cool one person is, it about what things you can accomplish as a team.
What time management tips do you have?
A deadline is a deadline. If you cannot make something work in the time allotted, move on. The show must go on.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Realize nobody is perfect. Own up to mistakes, fix them, and move on. It doesn’t do to dwell on the past.

– – –

#6
Rachel Mills
Shawnee, Kansas

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known how strict to be at the beginning of the year rather than wait until some deadlines were starting to be missed or people were not getting their work done. As an editor, one must set the pace early on for how the rest of the year is going to go. If your work gets done early, hopefully everyone else will do the same. Also, I wish we would have organized more time to get out of the journalism room. There were times where we spent an unhealthy amount of time in the room. Be brave, bold, and different! My co-editor and I tried a lot of different and new ideas and formats that our previous books had never done before. It ended up being a really successful and good looking book. Overall, each year is different and each staff is different. If the editors go about the year (the WHOLE year) with a positive attitude and really try to learn more about each staff member then that year (and book) will be a successful one.
What time management tips do you have?
Make as many spreadsheets as possible! I was lucky I had Katherine as my co-editor because she was so organized and always on top of the time management aspect of the job. She had a spreadsheet for every deadline, every main story and quick read that went into the book, and for each staff member. This is something I do now that I wish I would have done then, but before you start each day make a list of all the things you need to get done. This allows you to prioritize, physically see what all you need to get done, and possibly add tasks you can’t do during that day to other people’s lists. LISTS LISTS LISTS!
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Each individual works in a different way. Learn the ways they like to work at the beginning of the year so you can tailor jobs to them and so you can give them jobs that they will enjoy and execute really well. Also, each person likes to be praised for the job they did — whether they did a poor or great job. Learn how the person likes to be praised (gifts, in front of people, a little note, a hug, etc). If your staff members see that they are appreciated then they will want to do a better job for you.

– – –

#7
Zach Libby 
Rochester, Michigan

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known the responsibility an editor has in running the school paper. You’re not only doing your own work load, you’re watching over other staff writers; giving them advice/tips and reviewing what they have done for the paper every given month.
What time management tips do you have?
I understand more with time managements that deadlines are something that should be taken seriously. Never cut corners and take your position as editor seriously, your laziness reflects on your peers and the adviser.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging pat of leading my peers is having patience when it comes to other staff writers. My advice would be that try and understand that some writers aren’t as exceptional to journalism as you. Take the time to help them improve their skills so they can one day lead other staff writers in the future.

– – –

#8
Maureen Langley
Bloomington, Indiana

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known that not everything is on me. Sure, if a staff member doesn’t submit something to the website on time that’s bad, but it’s not on me.
What time management tips do you have?
Don’t put anything off. Do it as soon as you can, otherwise it will never get done.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The role of friend/editor. You don’t have to be best friends with staff during class.

– – –

#9
Cassie Vital
Frisco, Texas

What do you wish you would have known?
I learned that being an editor means making sacrifices, but at the same time putting forth all my efforts to make sure the book is a success. There are so many bumps and struggles with design, copy, and photo that I wish I knew about so that I wouldn’t have made them, but I suppose that is a part of the learning process.
What time management tips do you have?
While on staff there were deadlines to be made, being an editor means enforcing those deadlines then meeting my own. Time management is extremely important because if a staff were to get behind, it could led to crucial consequences. Don’t take proofs lightly and be sure to move through them as fast as you can. They will sneak up and can cause much unnecessary stress.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The hardest part was being firm with the staff so that they took the editorial board seriously. We were afraid that there would be a separation between the staff and the board, but I learned that to some extent there needs to be. We were too busy trying to be their friend when we should have been more concerned about the quality and productivity they needed to bring to the book.

– – –

#10
Gigi DeWeese
Freedom, Pennsylvania

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known how important communication is. I have learned (with much stress) that without excellent communication, it is very difficult to accomplish many of the tasks of an EIC.
What time management tips do you have?
Because we publish a newspaper on a monthly basis, the most important aspect (like any kind of classwork) is to not wait until the last minute to get something done. If there is any way you can get ahead on layout or articles, it is imperative that one does so. For example, if there is a new idea you have for layout, but aren’t sure how well it would look, starting the template at the beginning of the month before layout is the main priority is always a great idea! The first issue of the year is always going to be a bear. It will most likely take the most time, and might be frustrating. However, if you can get past that, then you can re-use the basic template which saves a lot of time. However, don’t just settle with what was published for the first paper! Always look to improve layout- there are so many great ideas that you can always experiment with!
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most difficult part is working so closely with such a large group. Because our staff consists of 19 people, it is hard to convey all of the work that needs to be done, and making sure everyone is doing what they are supposed to. There is a lot of work to be done, and distributing it evenly has always been a struggle of mine. I also wish I would have known that there are times where you have to be prepared to make the choice between being polite to everyone or having a perfect final product. Though one can maintain a balance between relationships and having a good newspaper, it is not always easy! I would have thought the majority of my frustrations would be from the newspaper itself, but for the most part it is trying to get everyone to do their part to put forth the best final product possible.

– – –

#11
Laura Williamson
Shawnee, KS

What do you wish you would have known?
The true time commitment outside of class time and work nights that it takes to make sure everything is done. There were multiple nights a week that my co-EIC and I would sit at our houses designing pages, thinking up ideas, delegating assignments and finishing everything up so the paper could be sent to the press by 9 am the next day. I knew it would be a large time commitment, but there’s just no way to really know how much time you’ll be spending on newspaper outside of the required times.
What time management tips do you have?
Set a schedule and keep yourself on it! Zack, my co-editor, and I set out at the beginning of the year to make sure we were very organized and on top of things – due dates were set before the first day of school for all story idea group shares, theme ideas, pictures, captions, rough drafts, final copies, distribution dates, etc. We worked diligently to make sure our staff kept up with the deadlines and tried our best to assist them when they were falling behind. Zack and I also scheduled a time every week to work on newspaper related things outside of school/class/seminar/work nights. This helped us keep up with the pace of things, but we didn’t start doing this until after our 3rd or 4th paper came out.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
It can be very challenging at times to critique a peer’s work, especially if you’re good friends with him/her. Every now and then we would find ourselves disliking and changing a story/picture/design that the other person loved and it would kill the atmosphere in the room. Also, it was difficult to keep some staff members on task during our work nights without having to result to somewhat blunt statements.

– – –

#12
Jane Manwarring
Kirkwood, MO

What do you wish you would have known?
There is really nothing I wish I would have known at the start of the school year. I think beginning the year as an editor, there will always be a learning curve, but the only way to get past it is by doing things. There’s nothing I could have known that would have made me better, because I think experience has helped me more than anything.
What time management tips do you have?
My natural inclination is to do everything myself, but what I’ve learned through being an editor is I need to delegate tasks. The best way to manage time as an editor is accept the fact you can’t do everything, and there are always people to help.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part of being editor has been remaining calm in stressful situations. The best advice I can give to editors who will have to be in these situations is that it’s never the end of the world. Being calm in turn makes everyone else calm so it’s beneficial to the whole staff.

– – –

#13
Lexxie Hutson
Frisco, TX

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish that I had know the position of an editor has no boundaries. The position is not black and white and it can’t be out into a outlined box. By that I mean you’ll be asked to do things you’ve never done, you don’t know how to do, and things outside of your comfort zone on a daily basis. You have to be what’s needed when it’s needed.
What time management tips do you have?
It’s possible to work on multiple large projects at once. Most projects have down time when you can work on other projects. Start things as early as possible. Never sit around with nothing to do. Make a logical schedule & follow it! Sticky notes are your best friend.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Know when to be their friends and when to be their editor. Always keep in mind that yearbook is a business and you can’t always be having fun. Don’t be too hard on staffers, they’re usually pretty tough on themselves.

– – –

#14
Brianna Frashure 
Freedom, PA

What do you wish you would have known?
Currently, I work as an Assistant Editor. At the start of the year I wish I would have learned more about Indesign and Edesign. But over the course of the year my teacher and peers have been helping greatly to help everyone learn.
What time management tips do you have?
Like I stated before timing is very important. Procrastination is one of the worst things to do. Always use the time you have wisely to produce the best work possible.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Most challenging part is timing. Timing is definitely a big aspect in the class. The advice I can give to new Editors is, don’t procrastinate and get it done as soon as possible. But also take your time to produce good quality work.

– – –

#15
Morgan O’Neill
Saint Charles, MO

What do you wish you would have known?
That your adviser and staff and fellow editors aren’t waiting for you to fail, they want you to succeed. They are there to help guide you along the way. You won’t know everything. And the quicker you realize that the way to be the best editor you can be is by asking tons of questions and learning from others around you, the more successful you will be as not only an editor, but a leader, and even a journalist. Your adviser is there for you for the easy problems and the tough ones. Your staffer might know a couple more Photoshop tricks than you. And your fellow editors are there by your side through it all. Know that a publication is a team effort, and you aren’t alone, ever.
What time management tips do you have?
If you don’t have a planner you’re doing it wrong. That’s the first thing. Write things down. Find what works for you. Do post-its work best? Do it. Do little strings around your finger work? Do it. Besides that though it took me a long time to really understand time management. It’s not accomplishing everything on your to do list, and being up till three a.m and being dead to the world the next day — no. Time management is making use of every available minute that you have to accomplish a goal. If you have three major projects, don’t dedicate one whole day to it. Break it up. Spend two hours each day working on each one. That way you make significant progress and meet deadlines without stressing yourself out too much. You are going to encounter problems, and if you work on one thing for a whole day you are going to pull your hair out. Seriously, plan out what you’re going to do each hour of your school day. Make goals, that way you know your using your time wisely.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Maybe a challenge had been leading peers that are older than you or the same age. In high school age kind of matters. Kids care about seniority, but all of that should be left at the door when you walk into the publications room. That isn’t always the case. So just be prepared. Don’t let the fact that you’re telling a senior what to do phase how you lead the group. You are in the position you’re in for a reason and they still have to get their job done. Be respectful to all of your staff, and never act like just because you’re “the boss” means you get to be bossy — no. Just be strong and be prepared with whatever you do. Staffers can see what kind of day you’re having if you let it show. Don’t let it. Unless you are having a fantastic day, well then by all means spread the cheer! But if you’re frantic and unprepared and an older staffer or any staffer sees that they will start to lose sight of why they should listen to you.

– – –

#16
Danielle Kullmann
Rochester, Michigan

What do you wish you would have known?
That encouraging people is more important than criticizing their work. And overall, giving reasons why something is wrong is better than just saying that it is wrong.
What time management tips do you have?
Just utilize class time. Don’t do other homework, etc. Try to make the most of your own time.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
People who don’t try will be the most challenging part of leading your peers. I haven’t figured out that one yet, because for now my advice is just don’t let it consume your time and efforts. Instead work with the people who want to work with you first, and then move on. The people who want to stick around and make an extra effort deserve your time more than the ones who don’t.

– – –

#17
Emily Elsea 
Frisco, Texas 

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known the leadership skills I would need and what exactly my job entails. 
What time management tips do you have?
I know now that I should manage my time more efficiently I need to stick to one thing at a time. My advice would be to stick to one thing and finish it out because as my adviser always says “teenagers don’t finish things completely” which is true we don’t we stop and let it go. Stick to something and you’ll finish it out and feel really accomplished. 
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part is having to get on to them for not having something or for doing something they shouldn’t be doing. It’s hard having to say “you need to turn this in now I need this now” because they are your peers and you feel like equals but you aren’t. One thing I would say that makes it easier is to remember what the final product is. You are all striving to produce this book/newspaper/etc. so you want to make sure it is as good as possible if you have that mindset they will respect you for wanting it to be that way. 

– – –

#18
Taylor Blatchford
Highlands Ranch, Colorado 

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known that not everything will go as planned, but everything will turn out okay. It’s better to slightly adjust your deadlines and give yourselves time to be successful than meet your deadlines but have poor quality content. Evaluate the situation as an editorial team and make decisions that you think will be best for the staff as a whole. 
What time management tips do you have?
I understand now that it’s important to work on one thing at a time and not get swamped by a variety of projects and deadlines. It’s easy to get overwhelmed by a long list of things to do and not know where to start working. Pick something, get it done and check it off the list. Move on to something else. Your work will be much better if you give each individual task your full attention instead of trying to multitask too much.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part of leading my peers is motivating them to produce high quality work on deadline. Everyone is motivated differently, and there’s no perfect way to encourage your staff to do their work. I’ve learned that the most powerful way to motivate is through empowering the staff to make their own choices and plans for coverage while working alongside them to help them accomplish individual and collective goals.

– – –

#19
Drake Kruep
St. Charles, Missouri 

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I knew how to make my staff want to strive to make my section as good as I wanted it to be.
What time management tips do you have?
If you are a procrastinator (like I was) than you need to quickly kill that habit of waiting till the last minute to do your work. Because when you are running a staff your in charge of your staff and your own work, so you do not have a lot of time to dilly dally.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Keeping their attention and trying to get spreads done and on point the very first time.
I would make sure to have a good plan or calendar before getting to work.

– – –

#20
Tucker Love
Overland Park, Kansas 

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I knew that everything, ultimately will work out in the end. You are capable of doing a lot more than you think, so don’t put the thought in your head that you can’t participate in other things because you won’t be able to get the yearbook or newspaper done. I understand the love and dedication that comes from being an editor, but don’t let it prevent you from doing something in your high school career that you might regret not doing later down the line.
What time management tips do you have?
Time is precious. You have to be smart about where you put your time. If you want to create something that is smart and beautiful and quality, it is going to take some time. On the flip side, the biggest thing I’ve learned is that you have to give yourself time to breathe and take a break. That is so important in maintaining a healthy balance between your health, work, and school.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
You have to recognize that not everyone will be satisfied with every choice you make. For me, that was hard because I had a natural desire to try and please everyone, but I wanted to produce the best book possible. You have to work to find that balance of treating your peers fairly and with respect (just because you are an editor, doesn’t mean you’re suddenly a god), but at the same time making sure you can create a product that you would stand behind with confidence.

– – –

#21
Alexis Dagenhart
Frisco, Texas 

What do you wish you would have known?
That organization is key to your success as a leader.
What time management tips do you have?
Everything requires your time and attention so divide it carefully.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Have an open heart and mind to all opinions. 

– – –

#22
Michelle Keith
Freedom, Pennsylvania 

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have understood how important it is to make sure everyone does their fair share of the workload while still making sure everything gets done on time.
What time management tips do you have?
If I don’t manage my time well it can lead to unneeded stress and I would tell new editors to plan for something to take longer than it probably will to eliminate last minute stress.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
Make sure you check on your peers progress so at the last minute their is not a panicked rush if someone hasn’t done their work.

– – –

#23
Hannah King
Austin, Texas

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known that establishing a respectful and friendly relationship with the staffers makes the whole process immensely easier. If the staffers appreciate you as an editor and person, they will be willing to do things for you a lot more than if you were always bossy and distant. Building those relationships really help the dynamics between editors and staffers and thus we can produce a better publication because we all respect each other’s opinions.
What time management tips do you have?
The most important thing is, GET STUFF DONE EARLY. Finishing spreads early means more time to proof them. The more you proof spreads, the better they will be. Time management is one of the most important components of making a yearbook. Publications aren’t something you throw together; they need time, love and patience. 
Most challenging part of leading peers?
The most challenging part of leading my peers is self doubt. I thought many times that I wasn’t good enough or smart enough to have the job. I constantly put myself down and had unnecessary anxiety about my job performance and how the staffers thought of me. Then I realized, I was chosen to be an editor. My adviser had faith in me. Everyone has self doubt, but that’s part of the process of becoming a leader. Have self confidence and know that that self confidence allows for the staffers to respect you more. Stepping up into an editor position is all about learning, and making mistakes is a good thing because you learn from them. 

– – –

#24
Hayley Harding
Frisco, TX

What do you wish you would have known?
The beauty of delegation.
What time management tips do you have?
Holy mother of goodness, delegate! At the beginning of the the year, I thought that because I was editor, I needed to be responsible for everything. How wrong I was… I would recommend that editors get a binder and several tabs and page protectors so that they can sort everything into groups and keep track of EVERYTHING–proofs, edits, deadlines, assignments–you get the point. My staff ended up calling it the creepy binder (it had every single student’s name, grade, address, phone number, etc…in hindsight, it is pretty creepy), but it saved our butt on so many occasions.
Most challenging part of leading peers?
People who just don’t want to play nice–the constant little digs at other members of the staff, disrespecting both myself and my adviser, all paired with an inability to turn in work on time. It took a bit, but I found that this girl was more concerned with her GPA than anything else, so it was easy: at first, we started taking away points. Eventually, after one particularly bad fit, we threatened to have her removed from the class, which would result in her getting an automatic failing grade. Never have I seen someone shape up so fast.

– – –

#25
Emily Hiter
Ellettsville, Indiana

What do you wish you would have known?
I wish I would have known a little more about design and what being an editor takes. It was hard for me to be strict towards the staff and I think some of that was the fact that I didn’t expect I would have to be so strict. 
What time management tips do you have?
I know now that you need to be able to completely manage your time. I know how to section off my work so that I can set mini deadlines for myself so that I can make the final deadline. The editors next year should prepare themselves for a lot of work in a short time, and they should make small deadlines for themselves so they can finish everything on time. 
Most challenging part of leading peers?
I think it was hard at times to remember I was the one leading them. I also had trouble keeping them on task. I think the editors next year should prepare for this task by having strategies to prevent this from happening. 

– – –

#26
Fionna Cruz
St. Charles, Missouri

What do you wish you would have known?
I’ve always thought that a great leader meant that you had to have all of the answers. I thought that it meant that you had to have the most experience. What I wish that I knew earlier is that being a great leader doesn’t mean this. Through my time as an editor, I’ve learned that a great leader is someone who can make people do what they need them to by being a good person. If you’re a good person, you do your job, you show the desire to learn and you work hard, your group will follow. 
What time management tips do you have?
I have used my 11:11 wish countless times to wish that there was more hours in the day. However, there’s only 24 hours. It’s up to you what you do with those hours. Before becoming an editor, I always tried to do everything at once. I soon learned that this was not my best idea. So, I made to-do lists to keep myself focused during my time in the room. I killed a lot of trees, but Mother Nature forgave me. My advice to new editors is to stay organized and find a system that works for you. If it’s to-do lists, do it. If it’s an app like Evernote, get it. If it’s post-it notes on your forehead, by all means go for it. Do whatever it takes for you to be ahead. It’ll be worth it in the long run. 
Most challenging part of leading peers?
I became an editor my junior year while our staff consisted of mainly seniors. I’m also short. Believe it or not, most third graders are taller than me. This combined with my age didn’t necessarily add up to an intimidating leader. So getting the staff to work and meet deadline was a challenge. My advice to new editors, (as cliche and overused as it sounds), is this: be a friend. Sure, you may be the EIC, but you’re still you. No one will respect you if you don’t show them respect. Be compassionate. Be strict. It’s a tough balance. However, nothing great was ever easy. 

3 thoughts on “What You Wish You’d Known

RESOURCE$ | Taking Your Newspaper to The EdgePosted on  12:54 pm - Aug 3, 2016

[…] How to be an effective editor  Thoughts from 26 actual student editors […]

Summer Assignment #2 | Bucs' Blade Classroom BlogPosted on  11:18 pm - Jul 13, 2017

[…] read these 26 tips from actual High School Editors.   […]

Leave your message